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Bronze Age by povorot Bronze Age by povorot
Part of a series of illustrations I'm thinking of doing highlighting dinosauroid cultural development. Each illustration would highlight a different subspecies and time period.

(Plus, I think I'm in love with the 'futura' font. It just helps with establishing an awesome fifties science textbook vibe to the image, as well. )
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:iconplatypus12:
platypus12 Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2014
How long do you suppose it would take a species to get from stone age to bronze age or iron age?
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:iconheytomemeimhome:
Heytomemeimhome Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2013
This is amazing I can't wait for further cultural advances...
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:iconcarriebailey:
carriebailey Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2013
Inspiring and awesome.
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:iconcaessaes:
Caessaes Featured By Owner May 31, 2012
Have to be hard design things for a non-human body type, n special when mouth is a third hand. But this stuff is very realistic.
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:iconleggurm:
Leggurm Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Why are their knives shaped like that? Is it to do with the Dinosauroids anatomy or something else?
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:iconrodrigo-vega:
Rodrigo-Vega Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2011  Professional General Artist
The fact that these bird-like dinosaurs have trained hunting birds just slightly smaller than them is awesome.
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:icondinodudethegreat:
DinodudetheGreat Featured By Owner Jun 18, 2010
I seriously want to see what kinds of empires does the Dinosauroids make. Or are you not so good in xenosocial sciences?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2010
Well, why would empire be inevitable? Cultural evolution has no destination any more then biological evolution does.

That being said, I admit that my knowledge of the para-xeno-social sciences is a little lacking...
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:icondinodudethegreat:
DinodudetheGreat Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2010
Well, one pack of Dinosauroids gets greedy and conquers all the other packs to expand territory.....And, you know the rest...Remember, Dinosauroids most likely will have territorially ancestor...
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:iconevilgermantier:
EvilGermanTier Featured By Owner Dec 21, 2009
Dude, how do they make their own armor ?
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:iconsouhjiro:
souhjiro Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2009
The similarity betwen the hunter and the pet is like humans had trained chimpanzees instead to dogs to hunt.....it boggles the mind
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:iconkladdpapper:
Kladdpapper Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2009  Student General Artist
Lovely details and a really nice concept! I like it a lot :D
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:icondsil:
DSil Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2009  Student General Artist
Brilliant!
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:iconajtalon:
AJTalon Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2009  Student Writer
Very fascinating. I don't think they'd go to an industrial revolution as quickly as us though-For one thing, they have feathers. While they'd want shelter, there's less incentive to find better ways to warm houses when you've got yourself a feathery coat all the time. Though of course there are other ways to get into an industrial revolution...
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2009
The hunting bird is interesting in this picture. Even when H. sapiens was young, there weren't that many other hominids, or even apes, and since then we've done a pretty good job of killing off the rest. If there is a big diversity of dromaeosaurs, it would do some really interesting things to their development. What sort of relationships do they form with unintelligent cousin species? After all, these species must all eat similar things, what keeps them from competing?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2009
Well, you have to remember, a lot can happen in sixty-five million years. I’ve made it so the world, along with heaps of successful mammals and oviraptorans, has deinonychosaurs - giant, beaked troodontid herbivores, tiny raptor-beaked flying troodontids, para-tyrannosaurid dromaeosaurs, and more conservative velociraptor-y fellas - in great abundance. So, accordingly, a pseudo-avian predatory troodontid and a highly intelligent omnivorous troodontid are not really that closely related anymore - perhaps as close as a cat is to a hyena.
The relationship between the two is closest to our relationship with dogs, or hunting falcons, even - they’re used to flush out/catch prey, act as a warning system - a whole bunch of things.
[link]
And the question of “what keeps them from competing?” isn’t really a good one - what, after all, keeps hyenas from competing with lions? Does anything? Why are they both still around if they eat the same shit? The same selective pressures that create all these ecological niches would still, to some extent, apply to dromaeosaurs and relatives.
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2009
Yes, but dogs and hunting falcons are useful because they can do things that humans can't, i.e. smell better, run more quickly, and fly (respectively).
So I suppose my question (not a very hard one) is what can the domesticated troodontids do that their masters can't?

hyenas and lions don't eat exactly the same stuff. They have different hunting strategies, which opens different species to predation. Yes, both species are capable of poaching kills from the other (lions can drive hyenas away from fresh kills, and hyenas are capable of eating bone-marrow that lions can't get to), but they are clearly capable of niche-partitioning.

My assumption here (and it may not be true---how many intelligent species do we know of?) is that human intelligence threw open new resources for us (as tools allowed us to hunt and gather a greater range of food, and live in a wider range of habitats). That translates into a larger niche, and increases the number of species with which we compete. Logically, the species that suffer the most intense competition would be the ones most similar to the intelligent species in question. Animals that remain can do something that the intelligent species can't. This leads to the same question I asked in the first paragraph.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2009
(though, conversely, tigers and wolves - which have a similar dietary overlap to the carnivores of africa - have a really shitty relationship [aka tigers just straight-up kill wolves all the time]. To quote wikipedia: "Tigers depress wolf numbers, either to the point of localized extinction or to such low numbers as to make them a functionally insignificant component of the ecosystem. Wolves appear capable of escaping competitive exclusion from tigers only when human pressure decreases tiger numbers." In this case, nobody respects any hierarchy.)
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2009
Okay, I get you. Well, basically, the 'ground-hawk' does all that - it has a better sense of smell and is a really fast sprint-flier, so it can catch things well. It's a semi-cooperative hunter of small mammals, which suits it well to self-domestication around dino middens. The dinosauroid is like us in the fact that it's body is versatile, but not, by way of it's anatomy alone, a particularly fearsome hunter or good smeller or whatever. The dinosauroid -like us - needs tools and animals to do what it can't with its claws.

Ahh - when you were talking about all the dromaeosaurs, I thought you were specifically talking about just the predatory dromies and how they would compete - or not, as I responded. The late creataceous is a good example of how the dromaeosaurs 'niche partitioned' (which is a good phrase, btw). But the question of dino-hominid and predatory dromaeosaur competition is a good one.

For a lot of this project, I've been looking directly at hominid development, and as it stands, hominids were simply super-versatile hunters for most of history. It's only homo sapiens that needed to kill off the competition. I guess the answer to the question you first asked, then, is simply that nothing keeps them from competing. Neanderthal sites, as far as we can tell, would often be taken over by hyena packs, then retaken by neanderthal bands, over and over in a long-running cycle of interspecies combat. Similarly, I've put up this oviraptoran as the direct plains competitor to the dinosauroid, much like hominids and hyenas. Hominids - and our feathery sophonts here - persisted because of greater dietary flexibility (like us - h sapiens) and greater behavioral and technological flexibility. A dinosaurian Pleistocene would see the extinction of larger, more inefficient eaters - but leave a lot of room for the smaller carnivores to divide the ecosystem. And competition does not necessarily mean extinction. Though they all live in the same ecosystem, hyenas, wild dogs, and lions all do well in Africa. Hyenas will often respect lion-marked territory, for example, and wild dogs can often fend off hyena bullying because of their superior pack coordination. All in all, I see the dinosauroids as the apex predators of their environment, but more like a lion pride or Neanderthal band then a nomadic pastoralist tribe. (aka part of the ecology rather then above it.) An animal doesn’t need to do anything different, really, to thrive alongside a competitor - I think sometimes it has more to do with behaviour and interspecies hierarchies then specific anatomical adaptations.

I think that covers it - did I miss anything?
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2009
Sorry I took so long to answer this great explanation. Yes, I think I understand your take on this pretty well---basically these dinosauroids are an illustration of hominid evolution, right? So the oviraptorosaurs are equivalent to hyenas and the ground hawks to dogs. Sounds good to me.
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:iconbuttwheel:
Buttwheel Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2009
This is just.. so great ;3;
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2009
Thanks.
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:icongozer-the-destroyor:
Gozer-The-Destroyor Featured By Owner May 29, 2009
Will they reach a stage of development comparable to our level of advancement, with vehicles and electricity and such? I'm trying to imagine a Norman Rockwell-esque scene with a family of these guys.

Also, are there homonids in this world? I apologize if you've said this already.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2009
Sorry about the long wait for answering...

With the cultural development, I'm not honestly sure so far where I'm willing to put them. I've only got as tentatively far as the bronze age - but Nemo wants to go all the way, I think (or at least to gunpowder!). Who knows, really...
(Also, no hominids of any sort. Primates, yes, great apes, no.)
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:iconsouhjiro:
souhjiro Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2009
Oh, your cultural perspectives on dinosauroids are so amazing!!!!!Congratulations!!!!

I guess with the time, as more drawings are showing accumulative development, could be depicted the first dinosauroid on the moon ;)
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:icontehfuzzyduck:
TehFuzzyDuck Featured By Owner May 12, 2009
I am so excited for more of these!
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner May 16, 2009
That's what I like to hear!
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:iconviergacht:
Viergacht Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009  Professional General Artist
I'm really intrigued by the embroidery - I'm assuming they use their beaks for that? They could really do a lot of strange, wonderful things as far as clothing, architecture and art with perhaps a strong instinctual component to the ability to weave.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2009
That's actually exactly the idea - just as men were predisposed towards throwing rocks and clubbing things, these dinos have an innate skill for pointy sticks and nest-weaving. I've been thinking a lot about the type of architecture that a species with a long evolutionary history of building would make, and I'm looking forward to doing up a few of the grand and not-so-grand ideas I have.

I'll give you a hint - the belgian waffle structure from the burning man festival. Take a look - it's amazing.
[link]
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:iconviergacht:
Viergacht Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2009  Professional General Artist
Very awesome.
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:iconiamsp00t:
iamsp00t Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
So is that a domesticated bird? How many millions of years ago from "our" present would this Bronze Age take place?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2009
The idea is that it mainly takes place during the late pleistocene during an interglacial much like our own (like the Eemian). So only a few hundreds of thousands of years in the past.
The logic behind putting it in the late pleistocene is, I think, pretty sound - all the smartest species of the world, us included, had a pretty huge evolutionary incentive to get smart during the brutal climate of the ice age (and there's no reason for dinosaurs to be exempt from that). Intelligence isn't inevitable, but it's more plausible for it to develop in a highly social animal during a time of ecological stress.
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:icondanieljoelnewman:
danieljoelnewman Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2009  Student Digital Artist
That is amazing. Please make more.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
Done.
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:iconpaintedkelpie:
PaintedKelpie Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2009
This is great! I have a question, in this world you are developing, do human exist?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
I'm afraid not - for whatever reason, the great apes never showed up in this timeline, much less humanity.
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:iconel-moppo:
El-Moppo Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2009   Digital Artist
I'm afraid that I can only describe this as, Fucking Awesome!

I Loves It! :D <3 :)
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
That's exactly the response I was trying for!
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:iconel-moppo:
El-Moppo Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2009   Digital Artist
lol. I love the style and the ideas. I wanna see them go to space! :XD:

Well... The inbetweeney stuff should be done first though. :D :)
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:iconfrazamm:
frazamm Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2009
Brilliant as usual. Will they invent wheels?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
Honestly, I don't know. I'm leaning towards not - and, looking at what the inca and aztec could do without wheels, it's perfectly feasible to have a fairly advanced culture/civilization sans wheel.
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:iconfrazamm:
frazamm Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2009
But I suspect in time they woudl have to discover them. Then again I should leave it up to you. It's that I can't imagine any 'advanced' civilisation not developing wheels for transport or anything else, like gears and such.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2009
yeah... I guess you're right. But wheels won't come a long for a little while yet...
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:icongiant-blue-anteater:
Giant-Blue-Anteater Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I cannot wait to see what civlizations arise from these animals!
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:iconlig28:
Lig28 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2009
Very nice picture. I love the series of tools he's got with him. And the cape is very well done. Great stuff all around.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
Thanks, man.
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