Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
September 25, 2009
Image Size
716 KB
Resolution
2151×1576
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
4,612 (3 today)
Favourites
84 (who?)
Comments
33
×
Filthy ... hopper. by povorot Filthy ... hopper. by povorot
So, after that last round of crits on my stomatopod-alien, I've been fucking around with the design in my spare time, and I landed on this. The legs have been changed from sprawled out bug legs to a slimmer-profiled layout underneath and alongside the trunk of the body. The antennal scales have been kept, along with the tentacles, but the stalked stomatopod eyes have been traded in for a specialized segment with four compound eyes, giving this fella a great field of vision.
I think this design might be the one I stick with. This has all been for a story idea I've been playing with, and eventually want to work on.

For previous iterations of this critter:
[link]
[link]
Add a Comment:
 
:iconhorsebatterystapleco:
HorseBatteryStapleCo Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I find it rather funny that I drew something almost identical to this in high school. Hahaha! I love this hopper of yours, though! Mine looks more like a coconut crab/horse.
Reply
:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
amazing! =)
Reply
:iconnederbird:
Nederbird Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2010
You've managed to make a great alien 'ere. Really, you have talent here. I hope your creations make into a film or game someday, or at least get a book with them in it. These things deserve it.

I have to agree with you that District 9's aliens looked too anthropomorphic, but if you ask me, it's still the best intelligent and not evil aliens that I've seen in a film.

Your previous designs I must honestly admit were a little too... shrimpy. Not that they were bad, they were good, but it look like the development team had been made up of intelligents shrimp who'd wanted to make an alien, rathen than us intelligent apes trying to make one. In short the result was pretty much the same, only the other way around.

However, with this, you've succesfully managed to get a perfect compromise between the too... not too humie nor too shrimpy and perfectly alien. Have you thought of writing a sci-fi novel someday?
Reply
:iconragingcephalopod:
ragingcephalopod Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2009
i like this iteration much better than the others. like the others, it is recognizably crustacean, but unlike the others, its body structure is much more alien. the tentacle limbs are much more pronounced in this iteration, and the legs have a more mammalian structure that make it appear more unconventional than the others. the only recommendations that i can think of are for it to have long spines on the "shins" of the limbs (like grashoppers and crickets) , have short hairs sticking out from between the joints, and make the rear legs thicker.
Reply
:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2009
I'm interested in seeing the possibilities of the flying animals in this world....what about giant volant crabs, perhaps with chitin extensions used as wings, and possibly hammer-limbs rather than tentacles, or possibly extendable tentacles used to capture prey in mid-flight.
Reply
:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2009
I really like the erect "centaur" stance. All those critics who point out that this does not look "crabby" enough," remember that a giant crab would really have a hard time supporting itself in any other configuration than a crawling-climbing existence, a-la giant coconut crabs.

There is one more method of running fast with a crawling arthropodian stance that I can think of. What about a giant centipede-dragon-komodo body shape?
Reply
:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2009
Thanks, man. I actually began this design process with the coconut crab as my arthropod model - as is most likely evident by the initial versions.

I like the idea of the fast-runner with splayed legs, komodo-dragon style. I'm thinking a predator... something like a hexapod mantis-shrimp, with big smasher front arms...
Reply
:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2009
This body plan is really fun to play with!

Another possibility is a giant "orang-utang" crab that lives in trees and climbs around with a combination of two frontal tentacles and coconut-crab-type legs. Just for display's sake, it could have huge inflatable sacs that make a lot of noise and look shocking.

The komodo-centipede model is also useful for herbivores. A long body can contain a long gut which is useful for digesting plant matter. There could be 8 or even 10 legged "train beasts" that roam the plains like sidewinding APC's. They could have a pair of mantis shrimp-type smasher legs on the front AND the back, making them impervious against most attackers... Except the hexapod komodo-mantis shrimps of course.
Reply
:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2009
I really like the idea of the eight-legged hammer-fisted herbivore. Part of the concept I've been working on for the hoppers, though, is that they're the descendants of a interstellar civilization that collapsed some 50-200k years ago - so the ecology of the re-wilded colonies will be comparatively limited, diversity-wise. That being said, I think there's a place for the hammer-headed herbivores, monkey-crabs, and maybe some other hopper-derived/related species. But non-hopper apex predators will be few and far between.
Reply
:iconragingcephalopod:
ragingcephalopod Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2009
you should also throw some ambush predators in there- something that cannot move its body quickly, but can strike out rapidly from a hiding place. it could be like a hermit crab crossed with a mantis shrimp, with a front section that has 2-3 pairs of sharp raptorial appendages, a long, serpentine midsection (for rearing up and attacking) and a rear section with hooked crablike limbs and a flat, flexible abdomen for anchoring itself. its body plan could also be flattened so that it can fit in narrow crevices.
Reply
Add a Comment: