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Oviraptor - Hyena Analogue 2 by povorot Oviraptor - Hyena Analogue 2 by povorot
The redesign of this earlier bone-cracking oviraptoran. [link]
I went for a skull much closer to that of Rinchenia, with the tooth-like palate projection being much closer to that of the ancestral oviraptor. On [link] ' s recommendation, these adaptable scavengers also sport a long, rough tongue, for scouring the marrow out of the previously cracked bones. The species shown here is one of the keystone species of pleistocene eurasia, playing a role very similar to the cave hyenas of our own past. These bone-cracking oviraptors developed during the pliocene, and only began to flourish as many of the more slender-snouted dromaeosaurs began to decline with their preferred prey during the harsh conditions of the ice age. The oviraptors were able to thrive in conditions that other predators could not, as they were able to fully wrest all the nutritional value from a carcass.
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:icontheharpyeagle:
TheHarpyEagle Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2015  New Deviant
Wonderfully thought out!
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:iconthanesdoom:
Thanesdoom Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Reminds me of psittacosaurus
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:iconenviroartist:
EnviroArtist Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I like how you made it look bigger with the fur/feathers all over its body instead of just the arms.
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:iconjakeparker:
JakeParker Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2011  Professional Filmographer
I'm on a dinosaur kick right now and I keep coming back to your dino designs, this guy in particular. Love her.
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2011
Thanks, man - I've been enjoying your work on flickr for a while now, and it's nice to know the feeling is mutual!

(Also, this is one of my favourite alternate-dino designs too.)
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:iconindigomagpie:
indigomagpie Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2010
Well, tyrannosaur coprolites are full of crushed bone, and tyrannosaurs do have much sturdier skull constrictions than your generic carnivorous theropod. Maybe they were so successful because of better carcass utilisation? (Take everything I say about paleontology with a grain of salt, I'm a rank amateur.)
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2010
Don't worry - I too am a rank amateur. That could well be a factor towards their success, though...
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:iconkazanlak10:
Kazanlak10 Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2010
Thats a really cool idea. Never really thought of oviraptors being specialized bone crushers. I remember that Greg Paul's "Predatory Dinosaurs of the World" mentioned that therapods were less efficient at exploiting carcasses then mammalian carnivores due to a lack of bone crushing ability. I realize that your fictional oviraptorid is meant to be a highly derived member of that group, but has anyone done a study of the mesozoic oviraptor species to see if their skulls perhaps could have generated the forces required to crunch bones?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2010
I'd expect not - but it is a very cool possibility, eh? What if rinchenia wasn't cracking nuts or mussels at all, and instead was, in fact, a mesozoic hyena?
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:iconrosutu:
rosutu Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2010
Interesting concept, making the normally piscivore or bivavevore oviraptors an analogue to a very carnivorous creature. Though how would that fare with their heavily derived jaws, and mostly-lack of cutting teeth?
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2010
Well, the teeth-like structures are for bone-smashing, but they still sport a sharp, eagle-ish beak (like the terror birds). They'd eat with more of the pinch-tear hawk action then cutting teeth mammal action.
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:iconrosutu:
rosutu Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2010
I see.
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2009
Wow, I never commented on this ! Well, it's awesome, I was thinking why not include some giant predatory species on either South America or some other landmass, mirroring the terror birds of our past. I'm also going to go and suggest some small arboreal and forest floor species which specialize in cracking hard nuts and fruit, similar to our Earths own parrots and hornbills ;)
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:iconpovorot:
povorot Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2009
Yeah - I've been thinking of small, suid-like roles for the oviraptorans, especially those in the tropics. S. America has plenty of it's own cool, weird critters to start with, though. Think of the unenlagiinae, for one - uniquely weird and adaptable dromaeosaurs.

I'll have more oviraptorans up soon, though.
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2009
Great, as for the unengaline dromeosaurs fishers are definately possibly, small vertabrate eaters known as Cockatrices, maybe even arboreal forms akin to small cats and primates (or raccoons). I can't wait to see the other oviraptorans in store as well ^_^
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:iconrayn-hammer:
Rayn-Hammer Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Simply glorious
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:iconfacist101:
Facist101 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2009
An interesting concept, i also enjoy seeing reinterpretations of dinosaurs =].
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:iconm0ai:
M0AI Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
Very nice concept. The rough tongue is a very plausible idea.
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